Impact-Resistant Windows Can Now Withstand Category 5 Wind Conditions

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Some people still use the old-fashioned way of nailing plywood over their windows in order to protect them, but there are more advanced ways to protect windows against hurricane-force winds.

People living in hurricane-prone areas know they should not take any risks when it comes to preparing their windows in the event of a hurricane, to protect themselves and their houses from flying debris and any kind of damage caused by a big natural disaster.

Some people still use the old-fashioned way of nailing plywood over their windows in order to protect them, but there are more advanced ways to protect windows against hurricane-force winds; such as installing hurricane shutters and/ or installing impact-resistant glass windows for the entire home.

According to the Fun Times Guide, “Hurricane windows are not the same thing as impact resistant windows. Impact windows are what you want if you want your house to have a better chance of surviving a hurricane.”

There are two different types of impact-resistance windows, one is designed for small projectile impacts, made from multiple polyvinyl butyral (PRB) layers. The other is PET laminated glass and glass-clad polycarbonate, which is designed to resist larger projectile impact

Nowadays, impact-resistant windows are designed to withstand category 5 wind conditions and the debris that comes with it. They can also protect the entire house against the sudden expansion of air pressure, which could happen as a result of a window breaking and could consequently damage the entire house.

In order for a window to be considered an impact-resistance one, it has to meet the strict guidelines dictated by The American Society for Testing & Materials (ASTM). There are also certain tests a window must undergo to be described as such. The first test is known as the “Launch Missile Impact Test”, where a 9-pound 2×4 wood stud is launched at 50 feet per second at the center of the window, and then at its corner, if it does not break. The second test subjects the windows to strong pressure that stimulates up to 200 miles per hour wind. If the window passes both tests, it is then certified and sold as an impact resistant window. To learn more about impact-resistant windows, follow this link.

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Name: Nadine Dirbashi
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Organization: WindowQuotes
Website: https://windowquotes.com/

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Name: Nadine Dirbashi
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Organization: WindowQuotes
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