Eating Disorders among Men are Neglected but Treatment shouldn't Be

To help men recover from eating disorders, treatment approaches emphasize the normalization of diet and eating behavior and include cognitive behavioral therapy

More than 10 million men in the United States suffer from and live with an eating disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Eating disorders affect 10 million people - and men - across the U.S. and cause more than $1.5 billion in health costs each year. About half of people who suffer from eating disorders and receive help are men. Men are more likely than women to seek treatment for depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, and depression.

The National Association of Males with Eating Disorders estimates that more than half of people diagnosed with eating disorders are male. Men account for about a third of the U.S. population with an eating disorder, binge eating, binge drinking, and other forms of binge eating - eating among men accounts for about 20 percent of all binge eaters, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

There is growing evidence that men respond well to treatment and that there is no evidence that men's eating disorders will continue to rise. However, it is difficult to find evidence of a significant difference in treatment outcomes between men and women with eating disorders. Boys and men are more likely than women to exhibit symptoms such as weight loss and weight gain. There is no difference between men and women in the U.S. regarding treatment options and outcomes for eating disorders.

Confusion about sexual orientation can be a contributory cause of eating disorders in men, and it is essential to acknowledge sexuality during the treatment process. This assumption has been widely refuted, and indeed 80% of men with eating disorders are heterosexual. Still, it can also be due to a stigma associated with eating disorders in men and discourage some men from seeking treatment. If you or someone you care about is a man with an eating disorder, do not hesitate to seek help. To make matters worse, eating disorders are much more challenging to treat in men than in women seeking stereotypical female illnesses.

Breaking down disrupted eating habits before they lead to an eating disorder is an excellent form of self-sufficiency. No matter how severe the illness, anyone suffering from binge eating disorders such as bulimia, bimetallism, or binge eating disorder must seek all kinds of support and treatment. For individuals suffering from binge eating disorder, a range of treatment options are available, some of which are tailored to their specific needs.

To help men recover from eating disorders, treatment approaches emphasize the normalization of diet and eating behavior and include cognitive behavioral therapy. Research on adults of both sexes to support the treatment of binge eating disorders in men and women and other mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and substance abuse, will continue.

As we advance, we must do more research into eating disorders in men and continue to work to expand services that educate about treating eating disorders in men. Parents can help us understand the reality of eating disorders in men and boys through the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Contact Info:
Name: Josh Crossen
Email: Send Email
Organization: Resurgence Behavioral Health
Address: 3151 Airway Avenue H2, Costa Mesa, CA 92626
Phone: Call Us 888-700-5053
Website: https://resurgencebehavioralhealth.com/

Release ID: 88982600