The Subterranean Termites Swarms In OC Homes and Businesses

Termites are estimated to inflict $5 billion in damage each year and are hard to treat on one's own. Since these wood-destroying insects represent a hazard to every property in Southern California, it is critical to be aware of potential infestation indications.

While fall and spring are unquestionably wonderful times of the year here in Orange County, they often bring swarms of pesky bugs that aren’t as appealing. Termites are estimated to inflict $5 billion in damage each year and are hard to treat on one’s own. Since these wood-destroying insects represent a hazard to every property in Southern California, it is critical to be aware of potential infestation indications.


Subterranean Termite Swarm in the Spring


Since flight periods for different species vary depending on ideal weather conditions, not all insect reproductives attack simultaneously.


The primary species swarm roughly a month apart in the eastern United States, with Eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes falvipes) emerging in April, trailed by darker Southern subterranean termites (R. virginicus) in May. One termite genus, light Southern subterranean termites (R. hageni), requires quite different climatic conditions and prefers to swarm in the fall and spring. This species’ swarms can last from August in cities along the eastern shore, through November.


The winged adults of this species are pale brown and significantly smaller in size. They frequently swarm at the same time in the day as the springtime swarmers. Due to their size and color, this species is sometimes mistaken for ants that cluster during fall and spring.


Signs of Subterranean Termite Infestation


Swarms of flying reproductive during spring, summertime, or fall, the existence of shelter tubes, and traces of tunneling in wood are all indications of a subterranean termite infestation in Orange County. Shelter tubes, also known as mud tubes, are the most prevalent sign of a subterranean termite infestation. Workers make these earth-hardened tubes out of saliva combined with dirt and fragments of wood or even plasterboard. Tubes are classified into four types:


● Working tubes are built from the soiled nest to timber buildings and may travel up concrete or stone foundations.


● Tubes that emerge from the earth but do not link to wood structures are known as exploratory and migratory tubes.


● Drop tubes connect wooden constructions to the earth, while swarm tubes allow new and swarming reproductive breeds to arise and fly away during the swarm season.


When termite tubes are broken apart, you may witness live workers and troops rushing through them. Another sign of an infestation is the browning or scorching of structural wood elements. Wood in damaged regions is often thin at the surface and can be easily penetrated with a knife or screwdriver. A live termite feeding within the wood is an unmistakable indicator of an ongoing infestation.


Termite excavations in wood are hollow, entirely contained, and somewhat vertical cavities. Some species leave light-brown feces in cavities. Subterranean termites feed in wood along the grain. These species target the gentler springwood, leaving the tougher, less digestible summerwood alone. This particular pattern of wood damage may often be utilized to differentiate subterranean termite behavior from that of other genera.


Call Preferred Pest Control


If you notice a Subterranean termite swarm infestation in the Orange County area, it is best to call Preferred Pest Control to deal with it.


Preferred Pest Control is proud to be the premier eco-friendly pest control services provider. If anyone suspects an infestation or any other pest problem, give them a call or visit https://www.preferredpestcontroloc.com


Restrictions may apply, so please call (714) 486-2637

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