Half of Americans Now Have Have Diabetes or High Blood Sugar

A new annual national survey by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases shows that half of all American adults have diabetes or suffer from blood sugar that is so high they are borderline diabetic.


The startling results of a new annual national survey shows that half of all American adults have diabetes or suffer from blood sugar that is so high they are borderline diabetic.


The survey also found for the first time that rates of diabetes among Asian-Americans were almost as high as other minorities, at 20 percent of the Asian-American population.


Catherine Cowie of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and one of the study’s authors said, “”The proportion of diabetes that’s undiagnosed is as high as 50 percent in Asian-Americans and the Hispanic population compared to about a third in whites and it blacks, diabetes prevalence significantly increased over time in every age group, in both sexes, in every racial/ethnic group, by all education levels, and in all poverty income (groups),” the team wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.


When ranked by body mass index (BMI) diabetes increases were only seen in people with a BMI of 30 or more. Body mass index measures the level of obesity. A BMI of 30 and above is considered medically obese.


The survey found that Asian-Americans were an exception to the BMI ranking, having an average BMI of 25, which put them in the overweight category but not obese.


The survey included data from over 5,000 people that was analyzed for the report.


The analysis showed that 12 to 14 percent of adults were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012, and of those almost all had type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is primarily caused by obesity, lack of exercise and poor diet.


The survey also found racial differences in diabetes rates, with 22 percent of the black population affected, 11 percent of the white population, 20 percent of Asian-Americans, and 22.6 percent of Hispanics.


Diabetes continues to be a deadly disease responsible for more than 71,000 deaths a year, and a cause of serious health problems that tax the health resources of the country.


Lifestyle changes, including weight management, switching to a healthy diet, and partaking of exercise can all help avoid diabetes and resulting serious complications. Visit the website for more information.


Release ID: 96793